Decision Making

When to reflect

Natural breaks offer the opportunity to look back

Yesterday I had the pleasure of working with the Southern Regional Management Team at Lowes Menswear. What a great bunch of people that inspired me with their stories of connection and care they have for their brand and respective teams.

Working with the Southern Regional Management Team for Lowes Menswear

Working with the Southern Regional Management Team for Lowes Menswear

One discussion point that we worked through revolved around reflection. What is it? When to do it? How to do it? And is it beneficial? There were a few highlights in the discussion:


1.       Awareness

Those that have attended one of my talks will know that I love Ernest Hemmingway’s quote “Everything in life happens gradually and then suddenly”. A great way to explain that our small habitual actions accumulate – both in a positive and negative way. Reflection gives us the opportunity to be smashed in the face (normally referred to as realisation) with how far we have come or how far we have slid over the past few months. Awareness is a powerful agent of positive change.

Positive and Negative habits accumulate to build powerful outcomes.

Positive and Negative habits accumulate to build powerful outcomes.

2.       Conscious Streaming

Cameron Schwab introduced me to a method call Conscious Streaming (or Stream of Consciousness) which is the technique of journaling our thoughts in real time. Click here for a more in-depth explanation. This is a wonderful way to become aware of your thoughts and make sense of them. A great way to set yourself up to make better decisions, especially when we find ourselves in an emotional state.

3.       Time is your friend

Reflection doesn’t take much time. In fact, sitting down with a paper and pen to write out some thoughts can take as little as a few minutes. When done regularly there seems to be a cumulative effect that builds. James Clear writes beautifully on the power of habits in his book Atomic habits – a great read for those wanting to implement habitual changes in the way they work and generally live.

4.       Do it your way

Writing the old-fashioned way can be a great way to slow our mind down, and neurologically has been proven to have many benefits (Huffington Post). But please don’t restricted yourself to this. Find a style that suits you and run with it!

5.       Anything

What stops many people is that they are not sure what to write. Freeing yourself of restraint is a great place to start. Ultimately, getting your thoughts on interactions with others, certain aspects of work, how we are feeling, and what we are thinking are all relevant. Keeping it simple, honest, and open is all that is required. And when you are done whatever you have written can be thrown in the bin. There is no need to keep it, file it, or share it unless you want to.

With almost four months gone in 2019 and the Easter break upon us this weekend presents a natural break in our working rhythms to stop and reflect on what is working, what is not, what can be tweaked, and what can be eliminated.

I hope you have a lovely break with your nearest and dearest over this Easter Holiday. Have fun and take a moment out to do a little thinking.

Contact Paul to organise a Lunch n Learn Session like the Lowes Team experienced - paul@paulfarina.com.au