Present

The Pro vs The Professional

Pro's make a difference, professionals* just act like they do...

In 2002, I got my first professional contract to play cricket in the UK. As the one and only “Overseas Pro” in the team there was expectation and local notoriety (everyone wanted to see you fail). It wasn’t a game changer financially, but it was a great vehicle to travel and experience the life of playing sport as a vocation.

It was during this period I gained a better understanding of what it took to be a Pro. But it was the environment at my grade cricket club at East Torrens in South Australia that showed me what it was truly like to be a Pro. Things like never missing training, being at training early, or staying late were regarded highly. . Effort was rated. And, helping others to get better was of deep importance. To explain this better, I will paraphrase the brilliant words of Scott Pressfield from his book The War of Art. He says, we are all born Pros already - we just need to do the following ten things:

1. Show up every day. Whatever the motivation, you get your ass to work.
2. Show up no matter what. Sick, problems at home, feeling anxious… no matter – get to it.
3. Stay on the job. Never leave until the whistle has blown.
4. Be committed for the long haul. Not always to one brand or project, but keep going until the body or mind gives up.
5. Acknowledge the stakes are high and real. Knowing there are consequences for our families, communities and colleagues – survival on many levels is at stake.
6. Accept remuneration. We get paid so do the work and do it well.
7. Don’t over-identify with our jobs. The Pro works hard but recognises they are not their job.
8. Master Technique.
9. Laugh at ourselves.
10. Receive praise and blame freely.

It is a serious list that aims to separate the Pro from the Amateur. But, I would add that Professionals* don’t do these things either. In the corporate environment, I saw it often that people would hide behind “being professional”. In Kim Scott’s Radical Candour, being Professional is at the heart of becoming a robot at work and sliding down the scale of “giving a damn” as a leader and colleague.

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Kim Scott presenting her Radical Candour work

For me, the Pro is present and able to give attention to what matters - they do the work (and more) assiduously. The Pro is proactive to avoid hiccups and problems causing jarring setbacks. And the Pro "Eats Last" to borrow from Simon Sinek. All of these attributes send strong signals to one’s team and customers – I am trusted, thorough, and care deeply for you. I am devoted to moving the project forward. I have summed this up below:

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The Professional* is the equivalent of plastic flowers. They may last, but they give zero sensory value, end up looking cheap, and eventually pollute the environment.

Being a Pro forms the cornerstone of leadership Role Modelling. When the person is passionate about their work being The Pro is easy to learn and apply.  Role Modelling is fundamental to what I call Captaining as these behaviours cause immediate elevation in team members. The team's performance continually improves as these habits become contagious.